Eric Rohmer

"Rohmer's awareness of human relationships is matchless, especially the intricate verbal games people play when trying to justify their desires. For his characters, the mind too often tries to trump the heart, and therein lies both their appeal and their tragedy." - Michael Brooke (The Rough Guide to Film, 2007)

Eric Rohmer

Director / Screenwriter
(1920-2010) Born April 4, Tulle, Corrèze, France
Top 250 Directors

Key Production Country: France
Key Genres: Comedy of Manners, Comedy Drama, Drama, Romantic Drama, Romance, Urban Comedy, Romantic Comedy, Period Film, Short Films, Psychological Drama, Comedy, Urban Drama
Key Collaborators: Margaret Ménégoz (Producer), Cécile Decugis (Editor), Mary Stephen (Editor), Francoise Etchegaray (Producer), Nestor Almendros (Cinematographer), Diane Baratier (Cinematographer), Marie Riviere (Leading Character Actress), Barbet Schroeder (Producer), Fabrice Luchini (Leading Character Actor), Beatrice Romand (Leading Character Actress), Rosette (Character Actress), María Luisa García (Editor)

"Eric Rohmer... was one of the founding figures of the French New Wave and the director of more than 50 films, including the Oscar-nominated My Night at Maud’s... In opposition both to the intensely personal, confessional tone of much of the work of Truffaut and to the politically provocative films of Godard, Mr. Rohmer remained true to a restrained, rationalist aesthetic, close to the principles of the 18th-century thinkers whose words he frequently cited in his movies. And yet Mr. Rohmer’s work was warmed by an undercurrent of romanticism and erotic yearning, made perhaps all the more affecting for never quite breaking through the surface of his elegant, orderly films." - Dave Kehr (The New York Times, 2010)
"All the literary content is peripheral to Rohmer's eye. It is in the quality of his imagery that we feel the intellectual appeal of experience. The camera style is classically simple, but Rohmer adores the effects of natural light, whether the reflections from snow in Maud, the rainy day in Claire, or the Côte d'Azur interiors in La Collectionneuse." - David Thomson (The New Biographical Dictionary of Film, 2002)
"Emerging from the crucible of the French New Wave, Rohmer has forged a style that combines the best qualities of Bresson and Renoir with distinctive traits of the Hollywood masters. And though he was never as flamboyant as Godard or Truffaut, Rohmer's appeal has proved much hardier." - Dennis Nastav (International Dictionary of Films and Filmmakers, 1991)
"In their own world, Rohmer's films are guaranteed to run and run. This may be because, although they are more or less conversation pieces, they are also cleverly constructed (he always writes his own screenplays) in such a way as to keep an audience's interest alive until matters dovetail at the end, by which time most of Rohmer's characters know more about themselves than when the film began." - David Quinlan (Quinlan's Film Directors, 1999)
"Highly intellectual writer-director and former film critic/historian - in 1957 he cowrote a book on Hitchcock with fellow enthusiast and director-to-be Claude Chabrol - whose dialogue-heavy, deceptively simple cinematic parables and proverbs on love and morality among the young French bourgeoisie actually represent some of the most astute and philosophically trenchant filmmaking ever." - Leonard Maltin's Movie Encyclopedia, 1995
"The characters in Rohmer's delicious comedies of error are largely defined by their relationships with the opposite sex. The sumptuous, hedonistic settings and seductive characters are essentially what the conversations, narrations, and diary extracts in the plots are all about. For films that deal to a large extent with resistance to temptation, they are tantalisingly erotic." - Ronald Bergan (Film - Eyewitness Companions, 2006)
"Rohmer's films are often criticized as being "uncinematic," meaning they are more akin to filmed stage plays, the action confined to very few locations and occurring in a short period of time when nothing much seems to happen. The average shot length in Rohmer's films is significantly longer than those of contemporary Hollywood. This doesn't make Rohmer's movies uncinematic, however. When directing, Rohmer maintains a talking distance from his actors that lends his scenes an intimacy not achievable in conventional stage productions." - Aaron Smuts (501 Movie Directors, 2007)
"An important figure in the French new wave, Rohmer is known primarily for his "moral tales," which leisurely speak of men and women, and the things they do to each other." - William R. Meyer (The Film Buff's Catalog, 1978)
"I'm less concerned with what people do than what is going on in their minds while they're doing it." - Eric Rohmer
TSPDT Guide
Highly Recommended
Chloe in the Afternoon (1972), The Green Ray (1986) , Boyfriends and Girlfriends (1987), An Autumn Tale (1998)
Recommended
The Sign of Leo (1959), Suzanne's Career (1963), La Collectionneuse (1966) , My Night at Maud's (1969) , Claire's Knee (1970) , The Marquise of O (1976), The Aviator's Wife (1981), Pauline at the Beach (1983), Full Moon in Paris (1984), Four Adventures of Reinette and Mirabelle (1986), A Summer's Tale (1996)
Worth a Look
Présentation ou Charlotte et son steak (1951), La Boulangere de Monceau (1963), Nadja à Paris (1964), Paris vu par… (1965) [also directed by Claude Chabrol, Jean Douchet, Jean-Luc Godard, Jean-Daniel Pollet, & Jean Rouch], Perceval (1978), Le Beau mariage (1982), A Tale of Springtime (1989), A Winter's Tale (1992), Rendez-vous in Paris (1995), The Lady & the Duke (2001)
Approach with Caution
The Tree, the Mayor and the Mediatheque (1993), Triple Agent (2003), The Romance of Astrea and Celadon (2006)
Acclaimed Films / IMDB Filmography
1,000 Greatest Films
Eric Rohmer / Favourite Films
The General (1926) Buster Keaton & Clyde Bruckman, Ivan the Terrible Parts 1 & 2 (1944/1946) Sergei Eisenstein, Pickpocket (1959) Robert Bresson,  La Pyramide humaine (1961) Jean Rouch, Red River (1948) Howard Hawks, The Rules of the Game (1939) Jean Renoir , Sunrise (1927) F.W. Murnau, True Heart Susie (1919) D.W. Griffith, Vertigo (1958) Alfred Hitchcock, Voyage in Italy (1953) Roberto Rossellini.
Source: Sight & Sound (1962)
Amazon Products
Films / Books
    Le Beau mariage
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